Home > Seminars > Principle Design, Experimental Proof, Implementation and Policy Recommendation to Establish Energy Supply-demand Networks Based on Integration of Economic Models and Physical Models

Principle Design, Experimental Proof, Implementation and Policy Recommendation to Establish Energy Supply-demand Networks Based on Integration of Economic Models and Physical Models

Start:

7/9/2015 at 2:00PM

End:

7/9/2015 at 3:00PM

Location:

258 Fitzpatrick Hall

Host:

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Vijay Gupta

Vijay Gupta

VIEW FULL PROFILE Email: vgupta2@nd.edu
Phone: 574-631-2294
Website: http://ee.nd.edu/faculty/vgupta/
Office: 270 Fitzpatrick Hall

Affiliations

Department of Electrical Engineering Professor and Associate Chair of Graduate Studies
Research Interests: Dr. Gupta's current research interests are in the analysis and design of cyberphysical systems. Such systems are the next generation of engineering systems and involve tightly coupled control, communication, and processing algorithms. Applications include structural health ...
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This talk starts with a brief introduction to the organization and target of our JST CREST project team. Then, we present a detailed description of two of our research activities related to real-time pricing. The former work investigates dynamic mechanism design for LQG power networks.  In the present framework, the generators and consumers are modeled as players with heterogeneous dynamics who behave so as to minimize their own personal cost functionals. Then, our main focus is placed on the design of a dynamic mechanism that guarantees social welfare maximization, incentive compatibility, and individual rationality/budget balance. The real-time price and monetary transfer costs are designed combining the traditional LQG control theory and mechanism design theory in economics. The latter work again treats dynamic players. Differently from the above, the players' dynamics are assumed to be already locally compensated so as to converge to given set-points while the set-points are determined by minimizing individual private costs under coupling constraints. In order to manage the constraint while maintaining the players' distributed decision-making, we design a real-time pricing scheme based on the traditional dual decomposition. While the dual decomposition deals with static problems, the present architecture is shown to guarantee stability of the entire system including the players' dynamics.

Seminar Speaker:

Takeshi Hatanaka

Takeshi Hatanaka

Tokyo Institute of Technology

Takeshi Hatanaka received the B.Eng. degree in informatics and mathematical science, the M.Inf. and Ph.D. degrees in applied mathematics and physics from Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan, in 2002, 2004, and 2007, respectively. Since 2007, he has been with Tokyo Institute of Technology, where he is currently an associate professor. From 2006 to 2007, he was a Research Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Kyoto University. His research interests include networked robotics and energy management systems. He is the coauthor of "Passivity-Based Control and Estimation in Networked Robotics" (Springer, 2015). He received 2014 Outstanding Research Award and 2009 Outstanding Paper Award from SICE. He is a member of the Conference Editorial Board of IEEE CSS.